The Highways of North Carolina
U.S. 70 
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Photo: US 70's view approaching Selma (Brian LeBlanc)
US 70
U.S. 70  493 miles
The Road: Enters from Tennessee west of Hot Springs (Madison County) and ends at SR 1380 in Atlantic (Carteret County). Nationally the road runs from Atlantic to US 60 at Globe, AZ.
Towns and Attractions: Madison Co.: Hot Springs, Marshall, Pisgah Nat'l Forest  
Buncombe Co.: Weaverville, Asheville, Oteen, Swannanoa, Black Mountain, Ridgecrest  
McDowell Co.: Old Fort, Marion 
Burke Co.: Morganton, Valdese, Rutherford College, Icard  
Catawba Co.: Hickory, Conover, Claremont  
Iredell Co.: Statesville  
Rowan Co.: Salisbury, Spencer  
Davidson Co.: Lexington, Thomasville  
Randolph Co.: None  
Guilford Co.: High Point, Greensboro  
Alamance Co.: Burlington, Haw River, Mebane  
Orange Co.: Hillsborough  
Durham Co.: Durham, Bethesda  
Wake Co.: Raleigh, Garner  
Johnston Co.: Clayton, Smithfield, Selma, Princeton  
Wayne Co.: Goldsboro  
Lenoir Co.: La Grange, Kinston  
Jones Co.: None  
Craven Co.: New Bern, Havelock, Croatan Nat'l Forest, Cherry Point MCAS  
Carteret Co.: Newport, Morehead City, Beaufort, Atlantic  
History: US 70 is an original US Highway that came to North Carolina in the beginning, joining NC 20 from Tennessee to Asheville and NC 10 east to its original end in Beaufort. Here is a closer look geographically:

Madison, Buncombe, and McDowell Counties
US 70 used a very windy routing from the Tennessee line to Hot Springs, which today is some abandoned routing; Fairview Loop; piece of Stokely Hollow Rd. US 70 foolowed its current route, the SR 1349 to Walnut and NC 213 back out. US 70 continued along current 70, then US 25-70 Bus through Marshall.
East of Marshall, US 70 used Rollins Rd between the RR and the French Broad River then followed abandoned routing south of the RR to where it crosses the French Broad River. US 70 then followed NC 251 south, then cut east on SR 1839 Heavner Rd (some maps say Old Marshall Hwy) to US 19 Business Weaverville. US 70 followed US 19 Business, then US 25 Merrimon Ave south to downtown Asheville.
In Asheville, US 70 initially followed US 25, then Biltmore Ave, then NC 81 east back to current US 70. US 70 followed its current path to Swannanoa, then a lengthy "Old US 70" to Black Mountain. US 70 followed current 70 through Black Mountain, then at Flat Creek Rd, US 70 used "Old Hwy 70 E" towards Ridgecrest. At oold Toll Circle, US 70 dipped south across today's I-40 to use Yates Rd, then dipped back over to "Old US 70 E" at Reservoir Rd. East of town, US 70 followed Yates Ave and Mill Creek Rd. About a mile into McDowell County, US 70 headed east on what is no longer public road that generally follows Swannanoa Creek (shown on Google Maps as "Old US 70") and picks up SR 1400 and SR 1407 into Old Fort. US 70 then picked up its current route east through Old Fort to Marion.
In Marion, US 70 used Machine Shop Rd loop along with Main St to Court St east, then Memorial Park Rd northeast and over to Nebo. As best I can tell, US 70 used its current routing east to Burke County.
About 1929, US 70 was placed on its modern routing between Marion and Nebo.

1926 Official
US 70 on Memorial Park Rd
1926 Official
1930 Official
US 70 moved to current route
1930 Official

About 1932, US 70 was rerouted in Asheville to leave Merrimon Ave at College Ave and follow Tunnel Rd east through Beaucatcher Tunnel out to Oteen. It is unclear if US 70 used New Haw Creek Rd and Beverly Rd but by 1936 it definitely was using today's US 70 routing. This new routing via the tunnel had been part of US 74/NC 20. The old route via Biltmore Ave remained US 25 (mostly unnumbered now) and NC 10 (now NC 81).

1926 Auto Trails
US 70 original Asheville route (NC 10)
1926 Auto Trails
1932 Texaco
US 70 moved to College/Tunnel
1932 Texaco

In 1939 (bridge date), US 70 was removed from Hollins Rd etc east of Marshall and placed on current US 25-70 Business.

1938 Madison County
US 70 between river and RR
1938 Madison County
1944 Madison County
US 70 north of RR
1944 Madison County

Between 1945-49, US 70 was placed on its current routing from Swannanoa to Black Mountain.
In 1954, US 70 was placed on its current alignment between Black Mountain and Old Fort, using what is now I-40's corridor. The old route via Lookout Pt became SR 1400.

1953 Official
US 70 via Pt Lookout
1953 Official
1958 Official
US 70 4-laned and 4 miles shorter
1958 Official

Also around 1954, US 70 was rerouted to use Woodfin St over to Merrimon. PArt of this had been part of NC 694.
Between 1954-57, US 70 was given split alignments in central Marion: EB continued to use the Main St to Court St. WB used Garden St to New St back to Main.
In 1960, US 25 was put on a newly constructed bypass around Marshall, leaving behind US 25 Business.
In 1961, US 70 was removed from Woodfin St and placed on what is now I-240 from roughly Town Mtn Rd overpass to Merrimon Ave. It appears that Woodfin became part of NC 694 for a while.
Between 1969-72, US 70 EB through Marion was moved to Logan St to Court St. Main St continued to be US 221/NC 226.
About 1972, US 70 was removed from Merrimon St (remained US 25) and placed on its current freeway north leaving Asheville. US 70 still followed US 19 Business towards Weaverville to reach Heavner Rd.
About 1981, US 25-70 was rerouted above Asheville to follow the US 19-23 freeway around Weaverville, then headed west as new construction to connect to the existing Marshall Bypass. Heavner Rd (some maps show Old Marshall Hwy) became SR 1839 and along the French Broad River became NC 251, including what had been the easternmost bit of the Marshall Bypass.

1959 Official
US 25-70 through Marshall
1959 Official
1960 Official
US 25-70 bypasses Marshall
1960 Official
1979-80 Official
US 25-70 hugging the French Broad
1979-80 Official
1982-83 Official
US 25-70 rerouted
1982-83 Official

In 1981 or 1982, US 70 received its current downtown Asheville routing, replacing NC 694 on College/Charlotte Sts.

1958 Official
US 70 moved to Woodfin
1958 Official
1968 Buncombe County
US 70 moved onto expressway
1968 Buncombe County

2009 Buncombe County
US 70 moved to College/Charlotte Sts
2009 Buncombe County

About 1982, US 25-70 received its bypass of Walnut, leaving behind SR 1349 and NC 213.
Sometime in what I am guessing was the early-mid 1990s, US 70 dropped the split alignment in Marion and uses two-way routing on Court St and Logan St.

1953 McDowell County
US 70 original Marion route
1953 McDowell County
1957 McDowell County
US 70 on splits
1957 McDowell County
1972 McDowell County
US 70 EB west of Main St
1972 McDowell County
2009 McDowell County
US 70 splits removed
2009 McDowell County

Burke, Catawba, Iredell, Rowan Counties
In Burke County, US 70 used today's routing except around Bridgewater it used an "Old US 70" (still paved in vintage concrete) that loops over current 70 to (no longer) cross Muddy Creek. US 70 followed current US 70 and then 70 Business to Morganton. US 70 followed Union St/US 70 Business east to mainline US 70, then followed today's US 70 through Drexel, Valdese, and Rutherford College. After Connellys Springs, US 70 used SR 1620 "Old US 70 loop" and Knobbs Landing which no longer crosses the RR back to today's 70 near Burke Blvd.
At Hildebran, US 70 followed 1st Ave SW, then 2nd Ave to 2nd St north back to 1st Ave (1930 Catawba County shows this routing for US 70/NC 10). US 70 followed Highland Ave to Conover which becomes 1st St before it runs back into current US 70. US 70 followed current NC 16 Business south to Newton, then southeast to Claremont Rd north to today's NC 10 to near Catawba, then used Hudson Chapel Rd and Buffalo Shoals road through Kyles Crossroad to Statesville, picking up Front St.
US 70 followed Front St then Salisbury Rd through Statesville out to current US 70. The route then followed lengthy SR 2638 through Elmwood. In Rowan County, US 70 originally used SR 1975 "Old US 70"; SR 1744 "Old Route 70", then a bit of SR 1001 Old Amity Hill Rd, then SR 1957 Baker Hill Rd through Cleveland and Barber. East of NC 801 NB, US 70 picked back up its current alignment towards Salisbury.
US 70 followed Statesville Blvd to Innis St south to Fulton St to Liberty St to then-US 170 (now US 29). US 70 then used today's US 29 northeast through Spencer to the Davidson County Line.
About 1929, US 70 was given its current routing from Conover east near Catawba and over to western Statesville approaching on Newton St to Front St, leaving behind some NC 10 and some secondary route (as NC 10 was also moved). Conover to Catawba was also given the NC 110 designation.

1926 Official
US 70 via Newton to Statesville
1926 Official
1930 Gen Draft
US 70 bypasses Newton
1930 Gen Draft

Between 1927-30, US 70 was removed from Fulton/Liberty and used Innis to new route of US 170/NC 15 on Main St.
Between 1931-36, US 70 was placed on 1st Ave through western Hickory.
In 1940 (bridge date), US 70 was placed on its modern routing in the Bridgewater/Muddy Creek area.
Between 1939-44, US 70 was removed from the SR 1620 loop near Icard.
About 1948, US 70 was placed on its current bypass of Hickory and Conover in a route swap with US 70-A.

1930 Catawba County
US 70 zigzag west of Hickory
1930 Catawba County
1936 Catawba County
US 70 straightened out
1936 Catawba County
1947 Gen Draft
US 70 through Hickory
1947 Gen Draft
1952 Shell
US 70 bypasses Hickory
1952 Shell

Between 1950-53, US 70 was rerouted in central Salisbury to leave Innis St on Fulton St northeast to Liberty St to US 29.
About 1956, US 70 was placed on its bypass of Morganton. The route through town is shown as unnumbered on the 1957 Burke County map but was US 70 Business on the 1962 Burke County Map.

1953 Official
US 70 through Morganton
1953 Official
1958 Official
US 70 bypasses Morganton
1958 Official

Between 1954-57, US 70 was routed away from central Salisbury by replacing US 70-A: crossing Innis St (instead of turning south) onto Mahaley Ave which becomes Confederate Ave. US 70 then turned south on Club House Dr over to 11th St down to US 29.

1926 Official
US 70 Innis to Fulton/Liberty to Main
1926 Official
1930 Rowan County Official
US 70 Innis to Main
1930 Rowan County
1953 Rowan County
US 70 leaves Innis early
1953 Rowan County
1957 Rowan County
US 70 thru eastern Salisbury
1957 Rowan County

In 1956 or 1957, US 70 was placed on its modern alignments in western Rowan County bypassing Cleveland and Barber.

1953 Official
US 70 through Barber and Cleveland
1953 Official
1958 Official
US 70 bypasses Barber and Cleveland
1958 Official

About 1961, US 70 was rerouted in Salisbury to follow Innis St south through Salisbury to I-85, then used I-85 north to Davidson County. The Mahaley Ave et al route has been secondary ever since.
About 1965, US 70 was removed from I-85 in the Salisbury/Spencer region. Instead it was given split alignments in Salisbury: EB used Innis St to US 29; WB used US 29 to Liberty St to Fulton St to Innis St. Innis St south to I-85 remained US 52 (now unnumbered).
Between 1973-80, US 70's EB split routing in Salisbury changed to follow Innis past US 29, then Lee St northeast to Liberty St northwest to US 29.
In 1981 or 1982, US 70 was placed on its current Salisbury area routing. Jake Alexander Blvd was already in existence as SR 1530 and SR 1702.

1962 Rowan County Official
US 70 moved onto I-85
1962 Rowan County
1968 Rowan County Official
US 70 removed from I-85
1968 Rowan County
1980 Rowan County Official
US 70 EB changes routes
1980 Rowan County
1984-85 Official
US 70 west around Salisbury
1984-85 Official

Between 1991 and 1993, US 70 was rerouted to its current Garner Bengal Blvd routing in southern Statesville. The Front St/Newton Rd portion of the old route remains part of US 64.

1984-85 Official
US 70 through central Statesville
1984-85 Official
1999 Official
US 70 rerouted from central Statesville
1999 Official

In Aug 2010 (NCDOT), US 70 was removed from SR 2638 east of Statesville.

Davidson, Randolph, Guilford, Alamance, Orange Counties:
Just after the Yadkin River Bridge, US 70 used Salisbury Rd through Lakeview, then Main St through Lexington. US 70 used Greensboro St northeast of Lexington, then "Old US 29" to Pilot. US 70 then used Lexington Ave and Main St through Thomasville. US 70 followed Turner St, then NC 68 to High Point. US 70 left today's NC 68 at English Rd, then used Main St and Montlieu out to Greensboro Rd, then Greensboro Rd and main St to Jamestown. US 70 then used High Point Rd through Sedgefield as it approached Greensboro.
Initially in Greensboro, US 70 used High Point Rd, Lee St, Fairground Ave, Spring Garden St, Aycock St, then Market St east out of town via Wendover Ave. US 70 followed today's 70, then NC 100 to Gibsonville and Elon College, then Haggert St at Elon College, then NC 87 through Burlington to Graham.
US 70 then followed NC 49 northeast back to today's 70. US 70 followed today's US 70 through Mebane and Efland. At Hillsborough, US 70 followed US 70 Bus east back to current 70 over to Durham County (the Old NC 10 alignment through University was bypassed in 1926).
In 1930, US 70 was given a southern bypass of Gibsonville and Elon College replacing the first NC 100. The old route through these towns became NC 100 and then NC 10A (today this is NC 100 and the old 100 through Elon College on Haggert St). Also, US 70 was rerouted to the north of Graham again over original NC 100 on its way to Mebane. Burlington to Graham became NC 54 (now NC 87) and Graham northeast out towards mebane became NC 62 (now NC 49).

1929 Official
US 70 through Gibsonville
1929 Official
1930 Official
US 70 more direct
1930 Official

About 1941, US 70 was given its modern routing between the Yadkin River and outside Lexington.
Between 1945-49, US 70 was placed on brief one-way splits in central Greensboro. NB used Market to Forbes to Summit; SB used Summit to Church to Market. Also in this timeframe, US 70 was removed from Fairground Av and Spring Garden St and instead use Lee directly to Aycock. Fairground Ave became an extended US 29A-70A.
Also between 1945-49, US 70 was put back on its original High Point route using Westchester to Lexington to Greensboro Rd. This was a route swap with US 29A-70A.

1936 Guilford county
US 70 through High Point
1936 Guilford county
1949 Guilford county
US 70 north around High Point
1949 Guilford county

About 1948, US 70 was placed on its current bypass of Hillsborough in a swap with US 70-A.

1944 Orange COunty
US 70 through Hillsborough
1944 Orange County
1949 Orange COunty
US 70 bypasses Hillsborough
1949 Orange County

About 1949, US 70 was given its modern routing between Lexington and Thomasville.
In 1952, US 70 was given bypasses of Lexington and Thomasville, leaving behind US 70-A routes.

1947 Gen Draft
US 70 through Lexington/Thomasville
1947 Gen Draft
1952 Shell
US 70 bpassing both
1952 Shell

Between 1950-53, US 70 was split in southern Greensboro: NB continued to use Lee to Aycock. SB used Aycock, Spring Garden and Fairground down to Lee.

1936 Gen Draft
US 70 initial Greensboro route
1936 Gen Draft
1949 Guilford County
US 70 reroutes in Greensboro
1949 Guilford County
1953 Guilford County
US 70 splits in S. Greensboro
1953 Guilford County

About 1957, US 70 was given its modern routing from Thomasville bypassing High Point, Jamestown and Sedgefield, then continued along today's I-40/85 corridor to bypass Greensboro, Burlington, and Mebane. US 70 tied back in to the original highway west of Hillsborough using today's Exit 161 at Efland. The old routing through all these places became one long US 70-A.

1955 Official
US 70 still through High Point and Jamestown
1955 Official
1958 Official
US 70 bypasses High Point, et al
1958 Official

In 1963, US 70 was removed from I-85 between Sedgefield and Efland and placed back on its former routing, replacing most of the US 70-A. The connector between I-85 and US 70 in Efland became a short US 70-A

1953 Official
US 70 Greensboro to Efland via Burlington
1953 Official

1958 Official
US 70 using new super-2 routing Greensboro to Efland
1958 Official

1963 Official
US 70 removed from I-85 Greensboro to Efland
1963 Official

In 1968, US 70 was given its current routing following US 29 north to Wendover Ave instead of E Market St and Burlington Rd

1967 Guilford County
US 70 via Market
1967 Guilford County
1968 Guilford County
US 70 via Wendover
1968 Guilford County

Durham, Wake, Johnston Counties:
Heading into Durham, US 70 initially followed Hillsborough Rd except it used Bennett Memorial Drive, then 9th St south , then Main St through downtown Durham. US 70 then jogged south on Alston Ave and left Durham via Angier Ave. At Bethesda, US 70 cut south on Miami Blvd to today's NC 54. US 70 then followed Chapel Hill Rd to Cary, then used Durham Rd, Chatham Rd and Hillsborough Rd which picks back up today's NC 54 in the Westover Area.
Initially, US 70 followed Hillsborough St, Edenton St, Fayetteville St south to Cabarrus St east to Bloodworth St south, MLK Jr Blvd east, then Garner Rd south out of Raleigh. US 70 followed Garner Rd through Garner and Auburn to Clayton where the road becomes Main St.

1926 Auto Trails
US 70 original Durham route (NC 10)
1926 Auto Trails
1926 Auto Trails
US 70 original Raleigh route (NC 10)
1926 Auto Trails

East of Clayton, US 70 picks up current 70, then US 70 Business southeast to Smithfield. US 70 then followed US 301 north to the Selma US 70 Business. US 70 headed east on 70 Bus, then US 70-A through Pine Level. At Princeton, US 70 used Donnie Jones Blvd and picked up current 70 east of town.
About 1929, US 70 was rerouted at Westover as new primary routing to follow Western Blvd from the Cary area east into southern Raleigh, then Boylan Ave northeast to South St. then north on Fayetteville St to Lenoir St east to East St south to today's MLK Jr Blvd to pick up where 70 had been before. The old route from Cary to Raleigh remained part of US 1/NC 50.
About 1948, US 70 was rerouted in Durham to use Duke St south off Main St, then Chapel Hill St east and Pettigrew St southeast to Roxboro Rd north. When Roxboro Rd met Main St, US 70 continued north over to Holloway St east to current US 70. US 70 then followed its current routing southeast to Raleigh. US 70 followed Glenwood Ave south to Peace St east to Person St, then south to New Bern St (EB)/Edenton St (WB) over to East St south as it always had getting to Garner Rd. From Roxboro Rd/Main St jct Durham to East St/Lenoir St Raleigh was a route swap with US 70-A.

1947Gen DraFT
US 70 via Cary
1947 Gen Draft
1948-49 Official
US 70 swaps with US 70-A
1948-49 Official

Between 1945-49, US 70 was removed from Bennett Memorial Drive, which later became US 70-A.
In 1952, US 70 was given a routing around the north of Durham: duplexed with then-NC 98 Miami Blvd northwest to Geer St, then west on Geer to Avondale north to what is now I-85. US 70 then followed I-85 west to where NC 147 ends, then Hillsborough Rd westward.

1949 Durham County
US 70 rerouted in downtown Durham, 1948-52
1949 Durham County
1953 Durham County
US 70 bypasses Durham
1953 Durham County

About 1953, US 70 was rerouted in Raleigh to leave Peace St on Halifax St south to the Capitol, then used one-way splits: Salisbury St to South St (EB)/Wilmington St (WB). Below South St US 70 followed McDowell St out of Raleigh and picked up today's US 70 Business bypassing Garner, Auburn and Clayton.

1936 Gen Draft
US 70 moved to Western Blvd
1936 Gen Draft
1949 Wake County
US 70 swaps with US 70-A
1949 Wake County
1953 Wake County
US 70 moved to the Capitol
1953 Wake County

About 1954, US 70 was rerouted through Raleigh to leave Glenwood at Williamson east to Dawson, then south to one-way splits: Dawson/Lenoir/Salisbury/South (EB); Wilmington/Lenoir/McDowell (WB). US 70 then used Wilmington St south.
Also in 1954, US 70 was rerouted to run directly from Smithfield to Princeton over an existing secondary road. The route via Selma became US 70-A.
In 1956 or 1957, US 70 was placed on its current bypass of Durham on the east side, as new construction. Miami Blvd below Holloway became an extended US 70-A; above Holloway and the Geer St piece remained NC 98; Avondale became part of NC 55.
In 1967 or 1968, US 70's Raleigh routing was altered to have the EB split use Salibury directly to Wilmington St.

1958 Official
US 70 avoids the Capitol
1958 Official
1974-75 Official
US 70 changes at South St
1974-75 Official

In 1970, US 70 was given its current bypass of Princeton leaving behind Donnie Jones Blvd.

1969 Official
US 70 through Princeton
1969 Official
1971-72 Official
US 70 bypasses Princeton
1971-72 Official

In 1973, US 70 was placed on the Raleigh Beltline east around the north side to today's US 1-401, then used Downtown Blvd southwest back to Dawson.
In 1983 or 1984, US 70 was extended further around the Beltline around the east and south of Raleigh to Saunders St, then US 70 used Saunders St south to Wilmington St. This left no primary routes inside the Raleigh Beltline.
Between 1988-90, US 70 was placed onto I-40 heading southeast off the Beltline. The old routing further west to Saunders and southeast back to I-40 became US 70 Business.
Between 1991-93, US 70's Durham Bypass was extended west along I-85 to Exit 170, leaving behind more US 70 Business.

1958 Official
US 70 moved onto more Durham Bypass
1958 Official
1993-94 Official
US 70 on more I-85 west of Durham
1993-94 Official

Also between 1991-93, US 70 was removed from the Beltline and returned to Raleigh surface streets. It went back to its previous routing from the northwest except at the south end of the one-way splits it used Dawson to connect to Saunders.
1975-76 Official
US 70 onto Beltline
1975-76 Official
1984-85 Official
US 70 moved onto more Beltline
1984-85 Official
1990-91 Official
US 70 moved onto I-40 SE of Beltline
1990-91 Official
1993-94 Official
US 70 removed from all freeways
1993-94 Official

Also around 1991-92, US 70 was rerouted east of Clayton to replace US 70-A to Selma, then continue as new construction bypassing Pine Level over to Princeton. The route via Smithfield became US 70 Business.
In July 1997 (NCDOT), US 70 was placed on new construction in the I-95/Selma area as a bypass. The old route that provided access to US 301 and I-95 became essentially another US 70 Business although it is signed as bannerless 70 while the new construction is signed as 70 Bypass.

1926 Official
US 70 initially through Selma
1926 Official
1954 Official
US 70 leaves US 301
1954 Official
1992-93 Official
US 70 bypasses Smithfield
1992-93 Official
1999 Official
US 70 bypasses Selma
1999 Official

In June 2008 (NCDOT), US 70 was given its bypass of Clayton by duplexing with I-40 from Exit 306 to a new freeway at Exit 309 east around Clayton. The old route through Clayton became US 70 Business.

1951 Official
US 70 on Garner Rd
1951 Official
1954 Official
US 70 bypasses Garner and Clayton
1954 Official
2009 Official
US 70 bypasses Clayton again
2009 Official

Wayne, Lenoir, Jones, Craven, Carteret Counties
US 70 likely started out using an abandoned alignment southeast at the Wayne County line to eventually connect to Charlie Braswell Rd, then east on Rosewood Rd across current NC 581, then east on NC 581 at its second junction. US 70 followed Ash St straight through Goldsboro out ot modern US 70. US 70 followed modern 70 except it used Washington St through La Grange. Coming to Kinston, US 70 used US 70 Business Vernon Ave into downtown.
US 70 stayed on Vernon across town, then picked up current NC 55 northeast through Fort Barnwell and Jasper. US 70 probably used the brick Beaman Rd near Clarks initially. US 70 entered New Bern along Broad St, then turned south on George St to cross the Trent River (where the rebuilt Tryon Palace is today).
US 70 used Old Cherry Point Rd which no longer is continous to Riverdale, then followed current 70 to Havelock except a loop at Carolina Pines Rd; abandoned loop at Pine Grove; Church/Miller Blvd. At Havelock, US 70 continued east along today's NC 101 to Carteret County.
US 70 followed NC 101 except it used Hardesty Loop Rd, Tuttles Grove Rd and Russell Green Rd. US 70 followed NC 101 to its current end, then south along what is now US 70 westbound to Beaufort. US 70 ended at Live Oak and Ann St.
By 1928, US 70 used modern US 70 and US 70 Business from Johnston County to Goldsboro. Ash St west of Goldsboro eventually became NC 402.
Also in 1928, US 70 and NC 101 swapped routings. NC 101 was sent to Beaufort while US 70 used Roosevelt Blvd south to modern 70, then "Old US 70"/Chatham St through Newport. US 70 approached Morehead City along today's 70, then used Bridges St east to I believe 14th St south to current 70 (Arendell Ave). US 70 used Port Terminal Rd and Old Causeway Rd to cross over to Beaufort where the route picked up Ann St. US 70 then ended at Live Oak St where the swapped NC 101 met from the north.
Also by 1928, US 70 was removed from Pine Grove Loop.
In 1931, US 70 was extended over NC 101 for a mile, then continued east as upgraded secondary routing out to Atlantic, ending east of Little Port Brook at SR 1387.

1927 Clasons
US 70 around to Beaufort
1927 Clasons
1930 Official
US 70 to Morehead City instead
1930 Official

1933 Official
US 70 out to Atlantic
1933 Official

By 1936, US 70 was removed from Beaman Rd near Clarks.
In 1941, US 70 swapped routes with NC 55 from Kinston to west of New Bern. US 70 followed today's US 70 Business and modern 70 east of Kinston, then essentially Sunset Blvd through Dover, Cove City, Tuscarora and Clarks.
Between 1939-44, US 70 was removed from Church/Miller/Roosevelt Blvd in Havelock and put on its current routing.

1938 Craven County
US 70 zigzag in Havelock
1938 Craven County
1944 Craven County
US 70 straightened out
1944 Craven County

Between 1945-49, US 70 was moved from Wilson St to Kornegay St in Dover.

1944 Craven County
US 70 using Wilson St
1944 Craven County
1949 Craven County
US 70 using Kornegay St
1949 Craven County

Between 1950-53, US 70 appears to have been rerouted in New Bern to use Eden and Front Sts to connect between Segments of George St.

1926 Auto Trails
US 70 original New Bern route
1926 Auto Trails
1953 Craven County
US 70 rerouted south of Broad
1953 Craven County

Between 1954-57, US 70 was rerouted in New Bern to use Broad to E. Front St to cross the Trent River, then onto newly built alignment (current 70) instead of Old Cherry Point Rd.
Also between 1954-57, US 70 was removed from Bridges St and placed on Arendell all the way through Morehead City.
In 1956 or 1957, US 70 was given its bypass of Goldsboro, leaving behind US 70-A (now US 70 Business).

1926 Auto Trails
US 70 straight through Goldsboro
1926 Auto Trails
1930 Wayne County
US 70 using George St
1930 Wayne County
1957 Wayne County
US 70-A through Goldsboro
1949 Wayne County

Also in 1956 or 1957, US 70 was given its bypass of Kinston, leaving behind US 70-A (now US 70 Business).
1955 Official
US 70 through Kinston
1955 Official
1957 Lenoir County
US 70-A through Kinston
1957 Lenoir County

Around 1958, US 70 was removed from Ann St to use its current routing over to Live Oak.

1957 Carteret County
US 70 using Ann St
1957 Carteret County
1962 Carteret County
US 70 using Cedar St
1962 Carteret County

About 1964 (bridge date), US 70 was given its new bridge/causeway over the Newport River between Morehead City and Beaufort leaving behind Old Causeway Rd.
In 1967 or 1968, US 70 was given its bypass of Newport leaving behind SR 1247 Chatham St.

1962 Carteret County
US 70 through Newport
1962 Carteret County
1968 Carteret County
US 70 bypasses Newport
1968 Carteret County

In 1969, US 70 was given its bypass of La Grange leaving behind SR 1603 Washington St.

1968 Official
US 70 through La Grange
1968 Official
1969 Official
US 70 bypasses La Grange
1969 Official

In 1978, US 70 was given its bypass of New Bern by using Gleburnie Rd south to a new freeway east around New Bern. The old route through New Bern became US 70 Business.

1957 Craven County
US 70 rerouted to E. Front St
1957 Craven County
1978-79 Official
US 70 bypasses New Bern
1978-79 Official

In 1979, US 70 was placed on new freeway from west of Dover to the recent New Bern freeway. Much of the old route became SR 1005 Sunset Blvd, but some remained NC 55 and Glenburnie became part of US 70 Business.
1940 Official
US 70 through Ft Barnwell and Dover
1940 Official
1941-42 Official
NC 55 swaps with US 70
1941-42 Official
1979-80 Official
US 70 moved to freeway
1979-80 Official

Between 1973-80, US 70 was truncated in Atlantic to its current ending at SR 1380 leaving behind SR 1417.

1972 Carteret County
US 70 crosses Little Port Brook
1972 Carteret County
1980 Carteret County
US 70 truncated
1980 Carteret County

Comments:
US 70 is 4-lane or freeway the entire route from Durham to Morehead City and is popular way to head to the coast.
Freeway US 70 bypasses for Kinston and Goldsboro are on the docket.
US 70 is a viable alternative from Asheville to Newport, TN as the route has few winding sections remaining.
On the freeway west of New Bern there are signs telling you to watch for bears!


Last Update: 2 March 2011

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